Yellowstone Winter Insights

We are recently booked for Yellowstone in Jan 2024 and reviewing clothing recommendations. Planning on layers and we are familiar w/ winter wear, synthetics, no cotton, etc. Ski pants / bibs w/ elastic internal snow shields over boots.

Biggest question is re footwear as we may need to make an addition there. I'm guessing wool socks, insulation & water proof bottoms most important. Lace up vs slip in for better fit and avoiding snow over tops. Would like to avoid calf high tops if possible due to space to pack... is something above ankle ht sufficient for walking, viewing, etc? We are not planning on snowmobiling, XC skiing, snowshoeing... just viewing the sights. I'm thinking boot / toe warmers can go a long way for comfort vs super arctic pacs? Any insights appreciated.
Thnx

Comments

  • DKloeber
    5:10PM in Wonderland: Yellowstone in Winter
    . . . .Would like to avoid calf high tops if possible due to space to pack... is something above ankle ht sufficient for walking, viewing, etc?

    You betcha! You won't be mucklucking through deep snow or shlush unless you desire and find such a spot. We wore lace-up, w/p boots that were slightly above ankle height walking, viewing, snowshoeing, and dog sledding. Since it is likely you could encounter snow at Boseman airport you can always wear the boots on the plane to avoid luggage weight.

  • I would seriously bring boots that are taller as well as soles that are thick and far off the ground, if possible. . Mine soles on my boots looked like car Firestone car tires. When I took this spectacular trip (which it definitely is) there were many times you will walk on mounds of snow, and short boots would get soaked with snow. Just one of these places would be a photo op at the Continental Divide. The sign of the Continental Divide wasn’t on a paved path. I have a picture to prove this. My boots went up to my calf and they were perfect. We also took yak tracks (ice grippers) and put them on our shoes often. I even wished I had electric heated socks. I had thick wool socks and I needed more warmth going to my extremities. This was our experience.

  • Thanks for the responses.
    AlanS... I've read you other posts about your experience w pics. Appreciate thecdetail.

  • DKloeber
    9:10PM
    Thanks for the responses.
    AlanS... I've read you other posts about your experience w pics. Appreciate the detail.

    No problem. When I said, "You won't be mucklucking through deep snow or shlush unless you desire and find such a spot . ." well, we had such an opportunity at Mammoth Hot Springs. Across from the dining hall there was a small field covered with undisturbed snow, a split rail fence, a few trees and a big elk, so we decided to try to get some close-up photos. The going was tough!!! The prairie grass fooled us as to the true depth of the snow! Not only was it above our boots, it was up to our thighs!!! It took us 15 min. to slog just a few yards through the deep snow to the fence which was only about halfway to our destination. Of course, by the time we got to the fence, the elk had started to wander off! :D:) Thank goodness for my camera lens. The depth of the snow around the elk wasn't a good indicator since it appeared he was sitting down.

  • DKloeber, how was your trip? Any tips as we are in the final stages for preparing our gear for this tour. Did you arrive a day early? What did you do in Chico? What did you do in Jackson, WY? Was there enough snow to go skiing/tubing in Jackson?

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file